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20130113
20130121
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lbj and trying to get drinks with -- how come you're not like bill clinton and not inviting mitch mcconnell and harry reid to camp david. how come you're not like ronald reagan and throwing back whiskey with tip o'neill. it is that stuff, as you've been noting and he pointed out, he does this but i think this is where there's a little bit of disconnect. i think there are people on the outside and look at what other presidents -- and say, why don't you do this more? the white house will say, guess what, people used to say the same thing about clinton and reagan. my guess is the truth's somewhere in between. it's not exactly as if the president uses his golf game to lobby members of congress, he doesn't. not as if he has a card game once a month he's bringing over the leader. he doesn't do things like that. is that part of the job description? >> the president said at the press conference yesterday, he has played golf with john boehner, does a good golf game. it didn't help in the negotiations. boehner keeps refusing invitations to multiple state dinners. there seems to be a problem wh
the deep end. and that's when bill clinton and like you said the dlc brought them together. here's the really disturbing thing. i remember, mike, back in 1995, a lot of people were talking about colin powell running for president. and i didn't want colin powell to run for president. he was a moderate. i was a conservative. but it wasn't the entire party and me against colin powell. like there were moderates in the center of the party. and we had this very positive give and take. >> what's happened? >> this tug. >> what's happened? >> the moderates in the party have collapsed. >> where are those voices coming from? >> i am now considered by a lot of the right-wing looneys to be a moderate, to be a, quote, rino. anybody that's listened to anything i've said on taxes, on the budget, on the fiscal cliff, i mean, i think my party made a horrible mistake on the fiscal cliff, and yes, i would stare at the president on a government shutdown and say, yeah, maybe shutting down the government's reckless, but you know what's even more reckless? continuing to spend the way you and harry reid
traditional progressive approach. as for your first question, absolutely, john. hillary clinton would, in fact, keep papering over this issue, although i do think there would at least be some kind of a bill bradley-style challenge. in 2000 al gore faced a challenge from bill bradley on his left. it wouldn't be as robust as bradley was in 2000, i don't think -- and that wasn't terribly robust in 2000, but i think there would be some nominal challenge from her left that would say, you know, democrats can't go back to sort of clinton-style politics. now, given her popularity, as you mentioned, john, across demographic and across ideological lines, i think it would be fairly minimal. there would be some kind of challenge there, i believe. >> gene, jonathan just mentioned sherrod brown's sense that, you know, they weren't going to go near entitlements because entitlements, that's who the democratic party is. that's who they are. entitlements are now 20% think of federal spending. how do the democrats, the republicans, how does this country survive economically without addressing entitlements? and b
to be lofty, inspirational and unifying, if anything? >> you know, i was reading bill clinton's second inaugural where he talks about, you know, the status quo nature of government which we see today as well, that americans a americans are to turn this division the government the way it is. the petty bickering they did for big things. i think the president wants to try to talk about where he feels he can have the most impact in his second term domestically and internationally which is a huge piece, by the way. because i think his first term internationally was about coming home, was about sort of pulling america back from its projection of power. there are so many both real problems and crises but also opportunities for the president. so i think that the speech is really about where he wants to have the most impact. and i think that's how he'll be judged, and that's where people will really take notice of what he says. >> david, before you tell us who's on "meet the press" this sunday, back to the speech for just a moment. do you think there's any chance at all that the president will
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4